Tim Walker Captures Tshecu Traditional Costumes and Couture Fashion in Beautiful Bhutan for Vogue UK

Last month Vogue published Tim Walker and Karen Elson’s  epic expedition into the Kingdom of Bhutan. The editorial explores the striking Himalayan scenery, astonishing Asian architecture and  the colourful composition of the countries rich cultural costumes.

Titled “The Land of Dreamy Dreams” the shoot explores a folkloric journey into the wilderness of  the beautiful Bhutanese landscape. Couture collections from CélineLoewePrada & Valentino are theatrical styled by Kate Phelan to embrace the drama of the costumes worn in the Cham dances of the monthly Tscheu festivals.

Traditionally part of Tibetan Buddhism (where the Tscheu festivals are now banned), the Bhutanese festivals are large religious social gatherings held on the 10th day of every lunar month. Seen as a form a meditation, Cham dances are performed by Buddhist monks who chant sacred mantras from beneath their costumes.  Different dances tell the tales of local gods, myths and legends and are caricatured through garish, comical and often horrifying costumes and masks.

Tim Walker: Karen Elson wearing Gareth Pugh for Vogue May 2015

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Tim Walker: Karen Elson for Vogue May 2015

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Tim Walker: Karen Elson wearing Simone Rocha for Vogue May 2015

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Tim Walker: Karen Elson wearing Alexander McQueen for Vogue May 2015

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Photography TIM WALKER
Styling KATE PHELAN
Makeup SAMANTHA BRYANT & hair DUFFY
Model KAREN ELSON

Useful references
http://www.timwalkerphotography.com/
http://www.vogue.co.uk/voguevideo/2015/4/21/watch-tim-walker-bhutan-shoot-karen-elson-video-diary
http://fashioncow.com/2015/04/karen-elson-in-the-land-of-dreamy-dreams-by-tim-walker-for-vogue-uk-may-2015/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tshechu
http://www.drukasia.com/bhutan/bhutan-festivals-calendar-2015/
http://www.itsnicethat.com/articles/tim-walker-karen-elson

Transcending Ethnicity and Crossing Cultural Identity: Interview with Alisher Sharip about his new photography exhibition Babylon 21

A few months ago I was invited to join a photography project exploring the identity of international residents living in Hanoi. The only mandatory obligation was that the model must wear a headdress of some kind in a bid to disguise their traditional appearance. Intrigued I agreed to participate as I saw it as a rare opportunity to appropriate my Vietnamese hill tribe accessories with contemporary fashion trends for a credible cause. (reading time 10 minutes)

About Babylon 21 Transcending Ethnicity

“This series of photographic portraits by Alisher Sharip represents the diversity of Hanoi, an amazing ethnic and cultural melting pot that is home to people from all around the world.

Moving from portrait to portrait, the viewer’s eyes go on a journey of individuals shaped not only by the communities in which they grew up but also by life in cosmopolitan Hanoi, an environment that often triggers creativity and allows a person the chance to develop abilities otherwise repressed by the demanding social-economic reality of the places they came from.

Life in Hanoi challenges identity at all levels, professional, social, religious and cultural. By stepping out of the stream of daily routine and creating unconventional images, the participants question the concept of ethnicity itself and demonstrate how contemporary cities eliminate ethnic boundaries and create global citizens.” For more information visit the event page on Facebook.

Interview with photography Alisher Sharip

  1. Can you briefly describe your background and experience in relation to working creatively and living in a multicultural society.
    In a way I’ve lived in a multicultural societies for all my life. Born in a mixed family in Uzbekistan (USSR at that time), I grew up in Belarus, did my MA and PhD in St. Petersburg, worked in the US and Vietnam. In all those countries I’ve always been a foreigner occupied in creative fields like icon painting, copywriting, journalism, TV production and scholarly research. The camera has been my working tool since early 2000s and a few years ago I started to make a living as a freelance photographer.
  1. How did the project start? Are there any personal experiences that inspired the project?
    It started spontaneously. I was working on a series of portraits of Mai Khoi the singer, and one day we were having a session with her and another singer, Dong Lan, they both wore scarves on their heads and I was amazed how the beauty of their facial treats stood out. Combining headpieces with ethnic clothes, I experimented the concept with a few other people. Hoang Minh Chau suggested making more similar portraits for an exhibition.
  1. You previously named the project Ethnica, why did you change the title to Babylon 21: Transcending Ethnicity?
    Ethnica sounded too broad. At some point I started thinking how to narrow it down and focus on the national and ethnic diversity of Hanoi. Then the metaphor of Babylon popped out in my mind and I decided to use 21 as a reference to both 21st century and the number of participants that equally distributes gender presence.
  1. How many people from different cultures and ethnicities are involved in the exhibition?
    There are people from different Asian countries, Europe, Middle East, and Africa. Quite a few people in the series have mixed ethnic origins.
  1. What is the significance of the cultural costume, headdresses or props in the portraits?
    My idea was to take people out of their everyday context, make them look different but still the way they wanted to look. So I asked them to prepare any sort of ethnic outfit they could think of – not necessarily representing their ethnicity but anything they associated themselves with. It was interesting to observe how some of them preferred their traditional costumes and others experimented putting together various national elements of costume, accessories and props to construct their identity.
  1. Working in fashion design and specialising in cultural costume I understand that our first impressions are often heavily influenced by the way individuals dress, do you think Babylon 21: Transcending Ethnicity challenges social stereotyping?
    In a way it does. When we see a person dressed like that we are puzzled for a moment trying to classify what we see. Traditional “hippie” label doesn’t always work these days so we might have to think of a new decoding system to read people’s style.
  1. As a participant for me the project aspires to explore, challenge and combine the visual identity of the diverse ‪‎ethnic and cultural community currently residing in Hanoi, would you say this is a accurate perception?
    Yes and no. I didn’t try to show what people really wear in Hanoi in order to create or highlight their identity. It was rather an attempt to change the frame, get rid of conventional brand clothes that we usually wear without thinking twice. I wanted people to look different. And I liked the transformation. Human beauty shines when our ordinary perception is shaken a bit, when we visually slapped in the face and puzzled for a moment. I can’t wait to see participants at the opening, browsing among their portraits, taking selfies next to their framed images and comparing themselves with their photographic doubles.
  1. Will you reveal the portrait participants true ethnicity or will the observer have to guess?
    I decided not to reveal their ethnic identities. Let it be a little hide and seek for the audience.
  1. How do you think multicultural communities have changed the creative scene in Vietnam over the past 10 years?
    Dramatically. I came here 8 years ago and couldn’t find a joint with live music. Vietnamese artists were trying to create new forms coming up with something that had been out of date at the Western art scene for decades. I observed the emergence of the musical groups and was myself a part of it for a few years. I remember how traveling musicians Jason and Luke started Cinemusic Wednesdays and Phuong Dang was a part of it too and the place was always packed with local and foreign listeners. Now you can just open Grapewine or TNH and pick a gig where to go every day. It’s a completely different world and huge part of this change is multicultural influence.

On Wednesday 3rd June 2015 my portrait and 20 others will feature in a photography exhibition titled Babylon 21, exploring how contemporary multicultural living in the 21st century can challenge, change and create continuous conversation questioning who we perceive people to be based on their appearance.

Babylon 21 photography exhibition opens on Wednesday 3rd June 2015 at 6pm at Chula 43, NHAT CHIEU , 396 LAC LONG QUAN, Hanoi, Vietnam.

Ao Dai for All: Hanoi’s Cross Continental Cultural Show

Happy Birthday Ho Chi Minh! Vietnam’s revolutionary communist leader who would have been 125 years young today. Still residing in state in his own mausoleum, Hanoi has seen a week long precession of celebrations and festivals in his honour. To commiserate this special event the department of culture and commerce wanted to celebrate the cultural diversity and creative collaboration in Vietnam today by hosting a special show combining both Vietnamese and international fashion designers and it’s residents. 4 mins reading time.


“Hanoi Connecting Five Continents” was a colourful event combining  music, dance and fashion, staged outside in Ly Thai To square at Hoan Kiem lake, the hub of Hanoi’s Old Quarter. The renowned designer’s NtK Nhat Dung ( Vietnam) and Diego Cortizas del Valle of Chula (Spain) presented their contemporary interpretations of Vietnams National traditional costume the Ao Dai.  Both designers collections were  inspired by Vietnams rich and exuberant artistic aesthetics. They applied an assortment of textile techniques such as hand painting, embroidery, beading and applique on a luxurious selection of multicoloured of silks, brocades and velvets. The designs themselves displayed influences from Vietnamese ethnic hill tribes, french iron works and even ceramic floor tiles.

Ao Dai for All

The Ao Dia is a high neck, slim fitting 5 panel dress, with side splits to the waist and generally worn with palazzo style trousers. It is the symbol of Vietnamese women and can be seen almost everyday in Vietnam as it is often worn for formal and special occasions by women of all ages. French, English, American, Russian, Australian, African, Spanish, and Vietnamese beauties proudly paraded down the catwalk in front of government officials, local and national residents and curious tourists. It has been along time since I have done any modelling, probably over 10 years, but this was too good an opportunity to pass up.  It was 35 degrees in blazing sunshine,  I was slightly shell shocked and extremely sweaty after 6 hours of fittings, rehearsals, hair and make up, but all the other models, organisers and friends made it such a fun and memorable experience. I felt proud after two years of living in Hanoi to be offered such a special opportunity to wear Ao Dai, the symbol of Vietnamese feminine beauty, and the pride of the Vietnamese people.

Morgan Ommer photography

Photo by Morgan Ommer

Morgan Ommer

Photo by Morgan Ommer

With special thanks to my friends Hoang Minh Chau, Diego at Chula and Nhat Duong for making me feel beautiful, and Morgan Ommer for his lovely photos.

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Useful Resources

Hanoi Connecting Five Continents (Vietnamese language)
Ao Dai Cultural Celebration 
A Brief History of Ao Dia
Chula Fashion
Morgan Ommer Photography

Shopping and Sleep Overs: Homestays with the Red Dao in Sapa, Vietnam

Rice paddy fields, Ta Phin, Sapa, North Vietnam

Rice paddy fields, Ta Phin, Sapa, North Vietnam

Referred to as the “Tonkinese Alps” Sa Pa is located near the boarder of China and is known as one of the hidden jewels of North Vietnam. It is the kind of place you see in those addictive brain twinkie internet viral posts, “30 places to see before you die!!” But this is justifiable for two very good reasons. The first being the gobsmackingly beautiful scenery; lush green rice paddy fields stretch as far as the eye can see. They overlap in surreal tier formations, covering the mountainous peaks that reach high towards the sky. Secondly, you get the rare opportunity to meet the culturally rich hill tribe population; the Black Hmong and Red Dao people have a strong visual presence in the area. Wearing and sewing their much admired handicrafts, they live in nearby family villages and can be seen everywhere from selling in Sapa Square to collecting fire wood in the forests. I went to Sa Pa on two separate occasions in the Spring of 2014. I spent one the night at a Red Dao homestay enjoying their cheery and welcoming hospitality, and the rest of my time learning all I could about the textiles, jewellery and costume that makes them so famously recognisable. Reading time 12 mins or scroll to the bottom of the post for my travel tips and advice on Sapa and homestays.


“Where you staaay?” “Where you staaay?” “What’ss your naaame?” “You buy from meee?”, “What’ss your naaame?” “Why you noo buy from meee???”

This is the intense greeting you can expect to receive as you step off the mini bus and onto Sapa’s P Chau May road, the main thoroughfare in town. Hmong women line the streets waiting to bombard the next delivery of unsuspecting wealthy tourists. Being touted before you even step onto solid ground can be very overwhelming and often give you the wrong impression about a place, but bare with it. My tactic for dealing with this anywhere is always; smile, don’t make direct eye contact, collect my bag and head to the nearest café with Wi-Fi (which there are plenty of in Sapa). After you dodge the crowds and check into a hotel you can take some time to potter around and make plans for the next few days. Over 3 nights and 4 days my friends and I normally decide to shop, spa, hike and hire a motorbike.

Sapa town is the first place I have ever been that brought my interest in cultural costume to life. From any point in the town you can look out in all directions and see a moving montage of red, black and green uniforms. It’s a bit like being in a real life Where’s Waldo picture. Images of people wearing glorious, vivid, and elaborate costumes are no longer fictional faces flat behind a screen, they are now stood in front of me shoving their wears under my nose for closer inspection. These people are extremely saavy at selling their souvenirs and I am extremely happy to go along with it.

It quickly becomes apparent that many of the hill tribe people have an adequate command of multiple languages; French and English are widely spoken. Surprisingly Vietnamese is only spoke by local business owners, and the minority people themselves have their own language with different tribal dialects to communicate in. Unlike most visitors who are there to buy a bed spread, bag and the compulsory traveller bracelet, I knew straight away I wanted to experience wearing a whole outfit and in the process spend more time talking to the women who made them. So with that in mind I skipped the retail shops and headed straight for the street stalls and market.

Sapa market is full on
With a cornucopia of options and low prices, stallholder’s competitive emotions can range from exotically charming to desperately forceful. It’s hard to know where to look when every direction you turn comes with the Sapa mantra “you, buy from meeee?? iiiiii giiive yooou dissscount!!” I finally settle down to talk to a couple of Red Dao women making jackets and bags on their foot peddled sewing machines. They try and sell me another bag. I politely decline and I explain that I am more interested in what they are wearing instead of selling. Intrigued by my request, one of the ladies pulls out 2 big bags from under the table filled with the traditional clothes they sell to each other. With a embroidered jacket in one hand and tassles in the other she smiles and say’s “you tryyy??” Cha-Ching! There’s a unanimous feeling we both hit the jack pot. Continue reading

Leaves, Bees and Hemp: Traditional Hill Tribe Textiles with the Black Hmong in Sapa

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Black Hmong Village, Sapa, Lao Cai, Vietnam

Sa Pa in the North West province of Lao Cai is one of the most un-missable destinations on the Vietnamese map. Boasting a spectacular picture perfect mountainous terrain and home to some of Vietnams 53 living ethnic minority groups, it’s hardly difficult to see why I have been there 3 times already. In January 2014 I took a day trip from Sapa city to visit a secluded Black Hmong village where there was an 90 year old lady and her family still handcrafting traditional costumes. Made almost entirely from the natural landscape they live amongst, here I was able to participate in workshops learning about traditional bees wax batik, natural dying from the indigo plant and how to cultivate hemp fibre for fashion. Reading time 10 mins or scroll to the bottom of the post for my travel tips and advice on Sapa.


So I’m in a weird juxtaposition between trying to keep as still as possible, and wanting to ricochet off the minibus interior. I’ve spent over an hour swaying from left and right, bouncing up and down, and jolting back forth, whilst forcing down half a bag of  crystallised ginger for breakfast.  OMG. Kill me now. “Are we there yet?” We arrive in just enough time to keep my dignity and put my stomach back in it’s rightful place. Our guide greets us and we commence on the walk to the destined village  which is only a 1 hour hike away.

Along my pilgrimage to the epicenter of natural fashion, we encountered many of the regional wildlife and domestic livestock living remotely in the area. Luminous green ducks, muddy buffalo, horny potbelly piglets (yep), chickens, butterflies and little birdies, all had free to range to roam around their landscape. Local villagers were living out their daily routines, working in the rice fields, collecting fire wood and cooking. Children could be seen playing in the streams, climbing rocks and trees, and curiously peering at me out of wonder. There was a small celebratory gathering hosted by a local charity who were distributing much needed resources such as stationary and toys for the children traveling to a school nearby.  Sapa is famous for it’s landscape and although I didn’t take many photos on this particular trip, it is near impossible for me not to mention the monumental views of the jungle covered mountains that surrounded our path. Touching the heavens and topped with ethereal white cloud it was impossible to gage their true scale, giving them the impression of an infinite reach.

Hmong Homes
As we drew closer to the village, tale telling signs of textile production reveal themselves embellishing the vicinity. Freshly dyed indigo fabrics drip dry on a bamboo washing line. By use of a foot peddled sewing machine or practicing their hand embroidery skills, creative young women can be seen sat outside their homes constructing the very garments that form the fashionable part of their cultural identity. The village it’s self is a makeshift yet firmly established combination of homes, huts and out houses, made from a collaboration of wood, stone, bamboo, corrugated steel sheets and concrete.

Continue reading